Power Law Strength Training – Revisited

** NOTE **

I am currently consolidating all of the physical training recommendations (along with a lot of other really great stuff) into a forthcoming new media project, Power Law Fitness. Please refer to this site for the most up to date information on this topic. Thanks!

9 Comments

  1. srhernan
    September 26, 2008

    Hi Dean. I looked at a variety of sources on the web for hints on how to do the specific exercises, and I solicited the opinion of a number personal trainers whose judgment I really valued. Basically, consult a variety of sources and extract the best from each one.

    Also, as a quick heads up, I’ve just created a new link on the home page so everyone can now access the details of this workout without having to search thought the site.

    Be sure to check it out!

    Steve

  2. Dean
    September 26, 2008

    Hi Srhernan,

    Excellent post, and I also have recently subscribed to Art’s private blog. Following the diet side religiously, and feeling much better for it!

    However, not done weights in years and didn’t really know what I was doing when I did (3 sets of 10, long pause in between!). I can’t find all the equipment listed in the gym i use, or how to do the excercises – do you recommend any particular book/video resource on doing these excercises right?

    Thanks

    Dean

  3. srhernan
    September 3, 2008

    Hey Andrew. Great comment.

    Those specific body parts are not at all neglected with this routine. For example, DB pullovers do a great job of developing your forearms while also hitting your triceps and shoulders. And deadlifts pretty much work your entire body. In fact, one of the greatest benefits of this particular workout is its high level of efficiency.

    I’m usually swimming or biking on my non-strength training days, plus I play a fair amount of volleyball – where I really notice the effects of this type of strength training. Now that I’m “off season” though, I may start doing this workout more than once a week. But it pretty much wipes you out for the next 36 hours, so it’s not something that I feel I can do without at least 4 days in between workouts.

  4. Andrew Paton
    September 3, 2008

    I noticed that ther are a number of body parts missing from the workout, namely triceps, calves and forearms. Why have these been left out? The other thing is what is wrong with training more than twice a week? On the non-training days what do you do to keep your fitness, do you for instance cycle, play tennis, etc..

  5. srhernan
    July 30, 2008

    The idea behind post-workout fasting is to maximize the growth hormone levels in your muscles while minimizing the stress hormone levels. For more info, check out my post on “Endurance Training and Growth Hormone Levels”:

    http://openwaterchicago.wordpress.com/2008/06/28/endurance-training-and-growth-hormone-levels/

  6. archana
    July 30, 2008

    Why wait a few hours after working out to eat? And why go to bed hungry once every few weeks?

  7. nodiets
    May 9, 2008

    Great post again. I would also recommend some High Quality Cod Liver Oil included in your post workout meal as Vitamin A is essential for testosterone production which will drive the muscles repair.

  8. srhernan
    April 20, 2008

    Hi Nick. Great question. Yes, I try to increase the weight for the 8 and 4 rep sets. However, most of the time I stick with the same weight just because it’s all I can do to finish them. But if you are able to up the weight and still do all the reps, then definitely do so.

  9. Chicago Nick
    April 20, 2008

    Hi SR,

    Greetings from the south side – are you upping the weight after each set or are you staying at the same weight? I noticed Dr. D advised upping the weight after each set – do you work that in?


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